Dividend yield on CAC 40

Banking, insurance, currency exchange, taxation, prices.

Moderator: Moderators

Post Reply
martyn94
Rank 5
Rank 5
Posts: 2086
Joined: Sun 14 Apr 2013 14:37

Dividend yield on CAC 40

Post by martyn94 » Tue 02 May 2017 23:34

I am trying to assemble some info for a friend who will shortly retire here with a lump sum (and no significant recurrent pension). He is not at all sophisticated financially, and I want to give him some idea of what he might get from a not-too-adventurous stock market investment - like an ETF tracking the CAC 40. But I am stuffed if I can find out what the dividend yield is (lots of figures on total returns, but that's too complex for him just yet). Am I missing some obvious source: if it were FTSE, I'm sure I could find it in ten seconds?

Pearsonb
Rank 4
Rank 4
Posts: 170
Joined: Thu 21 Mar 2013 13:41
Contact:

Post by Pearsonb » Wed 03 May 2017 10:19

Sorry can't help on the main question.

Assurance-vie seems to be the standard way here. I have my money invested in US shares via this and have made about 6% in five months.

It also has the great advantage that you can leave the money to whoever you want.

Pearson

martyn94
Rank 5
Rank 5
Posts: 2086
Joined: Sun 14 Apr 2013 14:37

Post by martyn94 » Wed 03 May 2017 12:39

Pearsonb wrote:Sorry can't help on the main question.

Assurance-vie seems to be the standard way here. I have my money invested in US shares via this and have made about 6% in five months.

It also has the great advantage that you can leave the money to whoever you want.

Pearson
It's not a question of leaving money to anyone. This guy will have to live on Kennomeat whatever he does (at least until his parents die): I'm just trying to help him afford a slightly more appetising flavour. What I need is just yield. But dividend yield: if he starts to think that he can draw down his capital it will rapidly become a train-wreck: he is much better at wishful thinking than at maths. (I'm about as good at both, which seems a fair compromise).

Pearsonb
Rank 4
Rank 4
Posts: 170
Joined: Thu 21 Mar 2013 13:41
Contact:

Post by Pearsonb » Wed 10 May 2017 10:00

Assurance Vie is different to UK life insurance and is roughly equivalent to a UK ISA. It is the principal means of saving money in France.

But for what your friend needs, this table might be useful

http://www.boursorama.com/bourse/action ... ndes.phtml


Pearson

martyn94
Rank 5
Rank 5
Posts: 2086
Joined: Sun 14 Apr 2013 14:37

Post by martyn94 » Wed 10 May 2017 19:06

Pearsonb wrote:Assurance Vie is different to UK life insurance and is roughly equivalent to a UK ISA. It is the principal means of saving money in France.

But for what your friend needs, this table might be useful

http://www.boursorama.com/bourse/action ... ndes.phtml


Pearson
Assurance-vie is not materially different from the bulk of life insurance money in the UK (ie "insurance bonds"): they come with high charges, and no sane person would buy either if they didn't come with random tax breaks, which are relevant in some circumstances but not in my case. Otherwise they are just an expensive way of getting what you could buy more cheaply elsewhere. If you think they are equivalent to an ISA, you will be disappointed if you ever cash in.

I'm grateful for the link to yields on individual stocks. But that wasn't my problem: I want my friend to buy the index, and would like to know the yield on that. I suppose I could build a spreadsheet from scratch, but I can't believe that it hasn't already been done, if only I could find it.

Pearsonb
Rank 4
Rank 4
Posts: 170
Joined: Thu 21 Mar 2013 13:41
Contact:

Post by Pearsonb » Wed 10 May 2017 20:08

I have cashed some in. I wasn't disappointed.

You are a fountain of knowledge on many subjects but this is clearly not one of them.

martyn94
Rank 5
Rank 5
Posts: 2086
Joined: Sun 14 Apr 2013 14:37

Post by martyn94 » Wed 10 May 2017 20:58

Pearsonb wrote:I have cashed some in. I wasn't disappointed.

You are a fountain of knowledge on many subjects but this is clearly not one of them.
I didn't say that you would be any more or less disappointed than with an ISA in terms of returns. That's a matter of your luck or good judgment. I did mean to say, which is true, that investment returns on assurance-vie are not tax free as compared to say a SICAV. Since tax free returns are the only thing that distinguishes ISAs from anything else, it seemed a salient point.

I do know about this stuff: it used to make my living.

Post Reply