These pooey Catalan traditions may shed some light on the popular Catalan saying
“menja bé, caga fort i no tinguis por a la mort!” (Eat well, poo strong and don’t be afraid of death!)  

What a summer of sport! Firstly France lift the Football World Cup, then the Welsh “domestique” Geraint Thomas pulled off the incredible achievment of winning the Tour de France, now the massive underdogs the Catalan Dragons have won the 117th Rugby League Challenge Cup Final. The Catalans became the first non English club to triumph in the sports oldest competition.

Here in Catalonia, All Saints’ Day and the evening before are known as the Castanyada, (’Fête de la châtaigne’ in French) meaning Day of the Chestnut.
Traditionally, ‘castanyes’ (roast chestnuts) are eaten along with ‘moniatos’ (roast sweet potatoes) and ‘panellets’ (small almond balls covered in pine nuts).

Gégants are enormous painted figures, several metres tall, constructed on a wooden framework with heads made from paper maché and plaster of paris – a tradition which goes back to the Middle Ages, depicting religious figures in parades.