As the rain clouds gathered on Thursday morning, I jumped in the car with two adventure-loving pals and headed up to the ominously-named Pont du Diable (Devil’s bridge) in Céret to meet up with our guide from Extérieur Nature.

Coming from the French word terre for “soil,” the word terroir originally described the special characteristics of a region, or piece of land, which gave different varieties of wine, coffee and tea their individuality. (Soil, climate, position, regional traditions….)

With quaint, cobbled streets, pretty squares, lively shops, restaurants, and bars, and art and music museums, there is certainly enough temptation to hang around the town, but there is plenty going on around and about too.

Céret is the undisputed cherry capital of the P-O, and probably the whole of France, its cherry trees the last of the spring fruits to blossom but the first to bear fruit. By May, the first cherries of the season are on their way to the President of France, and stalls, trestle tables, and rickety makeshift benches laden with the fruit appear on every street corner, in garages, lay-bys and the Saturday market.

Over the past five or six centuries, Girona has undergone twenty-five sieges and been captured seven times by a variety of famous French generals. Today, it is Mr O’Leary and his Ryanair army who have…

A stroll along the Canal de Bohère to St Michel de Cuxa. The Canal de Bohère runs from Serdinya above Villefranche de Conflent and ends near the lake of Vinça. Parts of its 42 km length provide the perfect flat winter walk, with glimpses through the naked trees of stunning views across the valley.

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