Taking place on or around 23rd April each year, a date linked to literature and popular tradition, the festival of Sant Jordi celebrates the Patron saint of Catalonia, French equivalent of St George, a Christian Roman soldier, who was martyred around 303AD for refusing to renounce Christianity

A tradition that dates back to the Middle Ages, the “goigs dels ous” (or “joie des oeufs” in French) are traditional Easter songs; ancient hymns sung by choirs in traditional Catalan costume, signaling a return…

This year, 2021, the calçotada calendar is Covid clear. But you can still buy them in all the shops and have your own messy feast at home. Find out more about these skinny leeks!

The Pyrénées-Orientales is officially Catalan country – Pays Catalan – and the locals have a strong cultural identity with a unique language, cuisine and spirit. You will have seen the red and gold Catalan flag everywhere but how well do you know Catalan culture and traditions? Take our quiz and find out.

These pooey Catalan traditions may shed some light on the popular Catalan saying
“menja bé, caga fort i no tinguis por a la mort!” (Eat well, poo strong and don’t be afraid of death!)  

A popular and much loved Catalan Christmas figure, this small statue, originally of a pooping peasant wearing traditional floppy red Catalan cap (barretina), crouches with trousers half down, in a ‘toilet’ position, making his small contribution to the land.

You may already know that the donkey is the symbol of Catalonia, French and Spanish, whilst the bull is the unofficial national symbol of Spain, but do you know how it all started?