These pooey Catalan traditions may shed some light on the popular Catalan saying
“menja bé, caga fort i no tinguis por a la mort!” (Eat well, poo strong and don’t be afraid of death!)  

A popular and much loved Catalan Christmas figure, this small statue, originally of a pooping peasant wearing traditional floppy red Catalan cap (barretina), crouches with trousers half down, in a ‘toilet’ position, making his small contribution to the land. He might be smoking a pipe or reading a newspaper to better pass the time!

Musique et voix en pays catalans is a not-for-profit association that aims to support and promote all musical activities within the region. With regular concerts and an annual festival, there’s plenty for music lovers of all tastes and ages.

What a summer of sport! Firstly France lift the Football World Cup, then the Welsh “domestique” Geraint Thomas pulled off the incredible achievment of winning the Tour de France, now the massive underdogs the Catalan Dragons have won the 117th Rugby League Challenge Cup Final. The Catalans became the first non English club to triumph in the sports oldest competition.

The first midsummer fire on Canigou in modern times was lit on 23 June 1955 by Francois Poujade and fellow USAP rugby fanatics – both to celebrate his birthday and Perpignan’s victory over FC Lourdes in the Yves du Manoir Challenge cup.

Taking place on or around 23rd April each year, a date linked to literature and popular tradition, the festival of Sant Jordi celebrates the Patron saint of Catalonia, French equivalent of St George, a Christian Roman soldier, who was martyred around 303AD for refusing to renounce Christianity